Twitter Suspended You? Here's How to Restore Your Account

Our Lucrazon Twitter account was suspended for 2.5 days. In this post, I’ll document the steps I took to get it back.

Thinking it was just a blip in the app, I let it go, and decided to check it again an hour later.

It STILL said 0 on both counts.

Feeling concerned, I decided to log into the account via desktop and that’s when the notice bar on top of my page said that the account was suspended.

Here’s Twitter’s example of what it looks like since I was too concerned with appealing the suspension –

How to reactivate your twitter account

You’ll get taken to the suspension page when you click on the link in the notice bar. Read the page carefully!

How to reactivate your twitter account

Be sure to be courteous when filling out the description of your problem. Even if it was a mistake on Twitter’s part, your support ticket won’t go anywhere especially when it’s riddled with angry expletives or incomprehensible sentences.

2. Submit the form and wait for the reply

I submitted my appeal form at 10:09 PM PDT and got an automated reply within 24 hours.

**They will send the reply to the email your Twitter account is registered to, so be sure you check that inbox or double-check your mail forwarding settings!**

How to reactivate your twitter account

In the reply, it mentions that if we were suspended for aggressive following behavior, we’d get a separate email. We didn’t, and plus, we’re only following about 5-10 accounts per day.

**To be ultra-safe though, I went into our account Settings, then Apps to remove any Applications that I’m not using anymore. You’d be surprised at how many apps add up!

3. If you didn’t receive a reply, check Status of the ticket

This isn’t too clear on the website, and I only stumbled upon this by accident while searching, but you can keep track of your ticket status via their Zendesk home. If you’re already logged in, you’ll see your ticket in “Check your Existing Requests” tab. (Update 3/17/15: Twitter has disconnected Zendesk's direct link to check status of your ticket. Please log into your own account and see if there is a status section)

4. Reply back to their Response

This was my response:

How to reactivate your twitter account

It took them another day to respond back to me

How to reactivate your twitter account

I didn’t realize that Twitter support reps had nicknames, so I was skeptical. But when I logged into my account, I did see that the suspension was lifted.

It took 2 hours for the follower and following numbers to return back to normal so there’s no need to re-follow.

If you haven’t been suspended before, take care to:

- Not follow other people aggressively (It maxes out at 2,000 per day, but just take heed in not spamming the follow button)

- Double-check what apps have access to your account and revoke unnecessary ones

- Have a strong password

Other Twitter members I’ve asked said it took 5 days to get their account back (ours took 2.5 days) so I believe the time varies depending on the severity.

Have you had your Twitter account suspended before? How long did it take to get it back?

We hope this guide was helpful! Remember to not panic and stay calm when responding back to their tickets.

Also, I've made a separate post answering some of the questions and comments I've received below in more detail here: Help! Twitter Suspended Me - Q & A Edition


You Probably Shouldn’t Deactivate Your Twitter Account

How to reactivate your twitter account

If you’re considering deactivating your Twitter account, whether to tackle social media addiction or for other reasons, you might want to read this post and reconsider.

First, a little backstory: I decided to take two weeks off Twitter in mid-November because I was wasting all my time in it. Simply logging out of Twitter on my PC and smartphone didn’t work , so I decided to deactivate my account and delete the Twitter apps. After a few days of back-and-forth tussle, I emerged victorious and stayed off Twitter for ten days. When I reactivated my account in early December, nearly everything was missing.

This is what I have learnt in the process:

Your account data will not be restored immediately

I deactivated Twitter on 23rd November, but was back a day later to tweet some crap (I had to!). When I logged in, all my user lists were empty (followers, following, lists). It didn’t bother me much because my timeline was still updating. Plus, Twitter had warned about delays in data restoration.

After tweeting the aforementioned “crap”, regret set in and I deactivated my account again (I know, I have issues). I reactivated my account about ten days later, and again found all my lists were empty. No big deal, because delays! But things were different this time – my timeline was completely dead. I actually had 0 followers and was following 0 people.

As I looked around, I found more missing stuff. All the mentions were gone from my Interactions tab (a quick search surfaced those tweets, so they were obviously still there but weren’t showing up in the Interactions tab). All the images I had uploaded were gone (the tweets associated with those images were still there). Worst of all, the 800+ tweets I had favorited were also gone (I spotted this after a couple of days). I use Twitter as a complementary bookmark service, so losing all my favorites was a bummer. Again, I did not pay too much attention to all this, because Twitter says it can take up to 24 hours for your data to be restored.

Horrible photo of a good cheesecake that I made. I can’t do photography. pic.twitter.com/eDytIjydVM

48 hours passed, and not a single thing had been restored, so I set out to contact an actual person at Twitter. It’s notoriously hard to find someone to talk to at a free online service company (it’s free, don’t complain!), and thankfully that wasn’t the case here. I found a contact form quite easily, and sent an email to The Twitter Support Institution. An email from Cheerful Twitter Employee arrived the next day saying everything was fixed. I am impress, Twitter!

Except, that wasn’t really the case. My followers and following lists were back, my timeline was flowing like butter again, my…no, that was it. Mentions, images, and favorites still missing. I sent another email stating this, didn’t get any answer for three days, so I emailed again. Cheerful Twitter Employee promptly closed the support ticket and let me know that Twitter engineers are on it, and I need not check back . Here’s a snapshot of the full conversation. None of the missing data has been restored since.

I want to be optimistic, and hope that the Twitter engineers will indeed fix this issue one day. Then again, I have been hopeful of getting Login Approvals (two step authentication) in my Facebook account for over a year, and I still don’t have it.

Unlike Facebook, which will retain your deactivated account indefinitely, Twitter will delete your account if you don’t reactivate it within 30 days. Now, this won’t come as a nasty surprise or something – Twitter warns you very clearly during the deactivation process. You will also get email alerts when the deactivation period approaches 30 days. Still, something to keep in mind if you’re considering staying off the Internet for more than a month.

So, the bottom line is that you shouldn’t deactivate your Twitter account. The entire process might go off very smoothly in your case, but chances are things will break. It’s certainly not as seamless as deactivating/reactivating Facebook.

That doesn’t mean you can’t take steps to stay away from Twitter (or any other service that you’re addicted to). Log out of Twitter from all your devices. Delete all your Twitter apps and bookmarks. Remove all traces of Twitter from your browser history – this way, the browser won’t recommend Twitter when you start typing ‘t’. Install a tool that will outright block Twitter for a period of time.

While we’re talking Twitter addiction, why not follow me there! I am not a complete disaster, I swear.


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How to reactivate your twitter account

How to reactivate your twitter account

If you’re frustrated with Facebook Frustrated with Facebook? 5 Tips to Reclaim Your Sanity Frustrated with Facebook? 5 Tips to Reclaim Your Sanity The real-world social implications of Facebook make it difficult to deal with frustrating online situations. Here are five tips to help you keep your Facebook feed drama-free. Read More , find it sucking up way too much of your time, are concerned about your privacy 8 MORE Steps To Regain Control Of Your Facebook Privacy 8 MORE Steps To Regain Control Of Your Facebook Privacy Read More , or simply no longer have a need for the social network — it’s remarkably easy to put your account on pause.

By deactivating your account, you can not only disappear from Facebook, it also stops your friends and followers from being able to comment on your posts or share any links or messages on your wall.

To temporarily deactivate your Facebook account, in a browser, go to Settings > Security > Deactivate Your Account. You can also deactivate your account through the Facebook mobile app. Go to Settings > Account Settings > Security > Account Deactivate. You will be prompted to enter your password in order to deactivate your account.

How to reactivate your twitter account

As Facebook points out, deactivating your account will “disable your profile and remove your name and photo from most things you shared on Facebook.” So if you’ve posted something on a public page, for example, it will simply read Facebook user. Things that will still be visible are messages you sent to your friends. Once you deactivate your account, you will be automatically logged out.

To reactivate your Facebook account, all you have to do is log back in.

If you want to completely delete your Facebook account, you’re going to have to reach out to Facebook. They don’t offer users an easy way to delete accounts themselves and once deleted, some of your data may remain on Facebook servers. Facebook says that it may take up to 90 days to delete any data stored in their backup systems, but that data will not be accessible on Facebook.

Facebook says that copies of “some material” may remain in their database but will bear no personal identifiers. They give only one example of what that data might be — log records — without going into any further detail. When deleting your account, if you log in during the time that it takes for your account to be deleted, it will cancel the deletion.

You can also download a copy of your Facebook data before deleting the account by going to Settings > General > Download a copy of your Facebook data > Start My Archive.

Have you thought about deactivating your Facebook account? Let us know why in the comments.