pull cards from air

Free magic trick where the magician pulls cards from thin air with this easy to do guide to one of the classic and most enj oyable basic moves of card magic. Do not be fooled by the simplicity of this easy card sleight. It is very visual and can be a real reputation maker.This move is timeless and you will be able to perform an impressive card production easily and confidently, after following this easy sleight of hand guide.

Amazing audience reaction as, you appear to grab card after card from behind their ears, under tables, even from thin air!

Pull cards from air

A small amount of cards should be held in the palm of the hand in palm position . Choose an amount of cards that you feel comfortable holding. It is not necessary to hold a lot of cards ( try and work out how many you plan to produce and count them out before the trick )

Pull cards from air

Grip the end of the pack with your fingers and use your thumb to peel of the top card.

Pull cards from air

Continue using your thumb to slide the card up to the audiences view, held beween the thumb and fore finger.

Pull cards from air

At the same time as you are pivoting up the card, the hand should be lunged forward slightly as if the card has been grabbed from thin air

Pull cards from air

Continue to produce cards from the air in this manner, throwing down each card to the audience before producing the next card as if by magic. Practice this tick in front of a mirror to see it from an audience eye view and get to get the best angle for the trick to be performed.


NAACP Urges Hallmark to Pull 'Racist' Card From Shelves

LOS ANGELES --- A space-themed, talking Hallmark graduation card is being pulled from store shelves because of the card’s reference to a black hole.

But members of the Los Angeles NAACP say the message sounds like "black whore" in the card's audio recording. That's how they hear it, and they say it's racist, KABC-TV in Los Angeles reported.

"That was very demeaning to African-American women when it made reference to African-American women as whores, and at the end it says 'watch your back,'" said Leon Jenkins of the Los Angeles NAACP.

The Hallmark card reads, "Hey world, we are officially putting you on notice," before playfully touting the ambitious future of the new graduate.

Characters known as "Hoops9quot; and "Yoyo9quot; banter on: "And you black holes, you are so ominous. Watch your back."

Hallmark calls the outrage a misunderstanding, claiming that the space theme emphasizes the power the graduate has to take over the universe, even energy-absorbing black holes.

"The intent here is to say that this graduate is not afraid of anything," explained Hallmark spokesman Steve Doyal.

Apparently, NAACP members heard something different.


pull cards from air

Please note this site has financial relationships with American Express and this post may contain affiliate links. Read my Advertiser Disclosure policy here to learn more about my partners.

If you have been thinking about getting one of those really cheap flights to Europe but haven’t pulled the trigger, fear not because you haven’t missed your chance. Now WOW air is offering $69 one-way fares from six United States cities to eight European cities…because $99 one-way just isn’t cheap enough!

There is a little bit of a catch in that to get the cheapest $69 outbound flight, you also have to book a return flight. The returns I checked are not $69, but they seemed to start at about $149. This brings your round trip total to about $218 if you don’t add any extras liked checked bags or seat assignments.

Pull cards from air

The reduced WOW rates are from these US cities:

The reduced rate destinations in Europe are:

You will be connecting through Iceland, which may or may not make this a better or worse deal to you. The reduced one-way fares will be offered for flights departing September through November 2017 with 200 discounted seats reportedly available on each eligible flight.

To give an idea as to what the extra fees are beyond one personal item, you are looking at $39.99 each way for a carry-on bag and $8.99 – $49.99 on each segment if you need a pre-assigned seat. In other words, this is only dirt cheap if you don’t care about where you sit and can pack lightly. If you meet those criteria, then have at it and go explore some of my favorite European cities for a very fair price!

Pull cards from air

Editorial Note: The opinions expressed here are mine and not provided, reviewed, by any bank, card issuer, or other company unless otherwise stated.


This new solar-powered device can pull water straight from the desert air

You can’t squeeze blood from a stone, but wringing water from the desert sky is now possible, thanks to a new spongelike device that uses sunlight to suck water vapor from air, even in low humidity. The device can produce nearly 3 liters of water per day for every kilogram of spongelike absorber it contains, and researchers say future versions will be even better. That means homes in the driest parts of the world could soon have a solar-powered appliance capable of delivering all the water they need, offering relief to billions of people.

Pull cards from air

The new water harvester is made of metal organic framework crystals pressed into a thin sheet of copper metal and placed between a solar absorber (above) and a condenser plate (below).

There are an estimated 13 trillion liters of water floating in the atmosphere at any one time, equivalent to 10% of all of the freshwater in our planet’s lakes and rivers. Over the years, researchers have developed ways to grab a few trickles, such as using fine nets to wick water from fog banks, or power-hungry dehumidifiers to condense it out of the air. But both approaches require either very humid air or far too much electricity to be broadly useful.

To find an all-purpose solution, researchers led by Omar Yaghi, a chemist at the University of California, Berkeley, turned to a family of crystalline powders called metal organic frameworks, or MOFs. Yaghi developed the first MOFs—porous crystals that form continuous 3D networks—more than 20 years ago. The networks assemble in a Tinkertoy-like fashion from metal atoms that act as the hubs and sticklike organic compounds that link the hubs together. By choosing different metals and organics, chemists can dial in the properties of each MOF, controlling what gases bind to them, and how strongly they hold on.

Over the past 2 decades chemists have synthesized more than 20,000 MOFs, each with unique molecule-grabbing properties. For example, Yaghi and others recently designed MOFs that absorb—and later release—methane, making them a type of high-capacity gas tank for natural gas–powered vehicles.

In 2014, Yaghi and his colleagues synthesized a MOF that excelled at absorbing water, even under low-humidity conditions. That led him to reach out to Evelyn Wang, a mechanical engineer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, with whom he had previously worked on a project to use MOFs in automobile air conditioning. After synthesizing the new zirconium-based MOF, dubbed MOF-801, Yaghi met Wang at MIT and said, “Evelyn we have to come up with a water-harvesting device.” She agreed to give it a shot.

At night setup soaks up water vapor from air, and uses heat from the sun to release it as liquid water during the day.

Pull cards from air

The system Wang and her students designed consists of a kilogram of dust-sized MOF crystals pressed into a thin sheet of porous copper metal. That sheet is placed between a solar absorber and a condenser plate and positioned inside a chamber. At night the chamber is opened, allowing ambient air to diffuse through the porous MOF and water molecules to stick to its interior surfaces, gathering in groups of eight to form tiny cubic droplets. In the morning, the chamber is closed, and sunlight entering through a window on top of the device then heats up the MOF, which liberates the water droplets and drives them—as vapor—toward the cooler condenser. The temperature difference, as well as the high humidity inside the chamber, causes the vapor to condense as liquid water, which drips into a collector. The setup works so well that it pulls 2.8 liters of water out of the air per day for every kilogram of MOF it contained, the Berkeley and MIT team reports today in Science .

“It has been a longstanding dream” to harvest water from desert air, says Mercouri Kanatzidis, a chemist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, who wasn’t involved with the work. “This demonstration … is a significant proof of concept.” It’s also one that Yaghi says has plenty of room for improvement. For starters, zirconium costs $150 a kilogram, making water-harvesting devices too expensive to be broadly useful. However, Yaghi says his group has already had early success in designing water-grabbing MOFs that replace zirconium with aluminum, a metal that is 100 times cheaper. That could make future water harvesters cheap enough not only to slake the thirst of people in arid regions, but perhaps even supply water to farmers in the desert.