how much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How much is 4 score and 7 years

How Much Is 'Four Score'?

Today's Snack: Eat 20 grapes, and sip a glass of milk in 20 sips.

Copy of the Gettysburg Address

from a reference book,

either printed out for each child or

projected onto a big screen

Scratch paper and pencil

There are many definitions of the word "score." One of them is "a group or set of 20."

Referring to 20 of something as a "score" dates back many centuries to the old Norse language. It is thought that Norwegian shepherds counted their sheep in groups of 20, and made a mark or notch called a "skor" on a stick to count a whole herd of sheep fairly quickly.

That grouping of 20 was Anglicized, or turned into the English language, as the word "score."

One of the most famous uses of the word "score" in that vein was the start of the most famous speech by probably the most beloved American president, Abraham Lincoln.

He gave the Gettysburg Address at a Civil War battlefield in Gettysburg, Pa., in November 1863, and wanted to start off on a formal, serious note since so many people had been killed.

So instead of saying that our nation was founded 87 years before that date, he said "four score and seven years ago."

If you multiply four times 20, you get 80, and adding 7, you get 87 years. That's the correct answer for the date on which he gave the speech, 1863, minus the date our nation was founded, 1776.

The Gettysburg Address is only 267 words long. Can you memorize it?

See if you can come up with the answer to this problem:


Express Entry CRS Calculator: Calculate Your Points for Canadian Immigration Express Entry Pool

Changes to the Comprehensive Ranking System (CRS) came into force on June 6, 2017. The tool below assesses an individual’s score based on the CRS points system used by Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) as of June 6.

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  • core human capital factors;
  • accompanying spouse or common-law factors;
  • skill transferability factors; and
  • factors relating to a provincial nomination, a qualifying offer of arranged employment, Canadian study experience, a sibling in Canada, and/or French language ability.

There are a total of 1,200 points available under the Comprehensive Ranking System. For candidates without an accompanying spouse or common-law partner, there are:

  • a maximum of 500 points available for core human capital factors;
  • a maximum of 100 points available for skill transferability factors;
  • 600 points available for either a provincial nomination; or
  • up to 200 points available for a qualifying offer of arranged employment; and
  • up to 30 points for Canadian study experience.
  • up to 30 additional points for French language ability, combined with English language ability; and
  • a maximum of 15 points for a sibling in Canada.

For candidates with an accompanying spouse or common-law partner, there are:

  • a maximum of 460 points available for core human capital factors of the principal applicant;
  • a maximum of 40 points for the core human capital factors of the spouse or common-law partner;
  • 600 points available for either a provincial nomination; or
  • up to 200 points available for a qualifying offer of arranged employment; and
  • up to 30 points for Canadian study experience.
  • up to 30 additional points for French language ability, combined with English language ability; and
  • a maximum of 15 points for a sibling in Canada (one sibling of the principal applicant and the accompanying spouse/common-law partner is considered).