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If you have reached this page you have probably discussed with us your options in obtaining credit reports on businesses (customers, vendors, etc). The link above will take you to the Equifax website that will allow you to order a single business credit report or a bundle of 5 reports. The prices start at $99.95.

Ordering your reports in this manner is the best option only if you think you are going to order less than 6- 7 reports per year. If you are on the borderline or know that you will order more than 6-7 reports per year becoming a member is a far better option. By being a member, you will receive almost a 70% reduction in the pricing for a report.

The membership option does require you to order a minimum of 2 reports per month or you will incur an automatic charge that is approximately the cost of two reports. Again the break-even point is 6-7 reports per year after which the membership option is the less expensive option. Please note that the membership is cancellable at ANY time with NO obligation. Also, we will be glad to waive the minimum fee for six months in order for you to become accustomed to ordering and using the reports.

We want you to make the decision that is best for your company. We will be glad to go over the options again with you.

If you think that the single report is the best option we will be glad to help you with any questions you may have regarding the credit report after you order it.

Feel free to call us at 1-800-945-3721.


Bill would give renters similar tax break to homeowners

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  • Homeowners have long been able to deduct their mortgage payment interest as well as their property taxes from their federal tax bills. But now renters may be able to get in on some sizable housing deductions too, if a recently introduced bill is passed in the U.S. Senate.

    Obviously, renters don’t have mortgage payments or property taxes, but the new bill, if passed, would allow tenants to deduct from their federal taxes what they pay in rent for their principal residence—to the tune of thousands of dollars of savings.

    “There’s an unequal treatment now of owners and renters,” Rep. Alan Grayson, the Florida Democrat who introduced the bill, told Realtor.com. “Renters should be able to share in the tax savings. This is a tax benefit that would go primarily to people who need it.”

    California already offers a “renter’s credit” for tenants whose adjusted gross income is $38,259 or less if single and $76,518 or less for married filers. But the credit is only $60 for singles and $120 for married couples. Hardly a windfall. Under Grayson’s program, renters in expensive cities like San Francisco could get tens of thousands in deductions.

    In the article, Grayson gave the example of an average taxpayer paying about $1,500 a month (or $18,000 a year). If he or she is in the 25% tax bracket, the savings could be $4,500 a year. Obviously in the Bay Area, where the average one-bedroom is well over that (check out the gallery above), the savings could be much greater.

    But living in an expensive area could also be a negative. Under the bill’s current language, renters would be unable to claim the deduction if their principal residence had an assessed or appraised value of over $1 million for the taxable year or $500,000 in the case of a married individual filing a separate return. In San Francisco, that could mean a family renting a newer two-bedroom condo wouldn’t qualify.

    Then there’s the question of whether or not the bill even has a chance of passing. For now, it is sitting in the House Committee on Ways and Means. Plus, Grayson currently has no cosponsors, which makes it unlikely that it will make it out of the Republican-held house. But you never know. Renters, reach out to your representatives or continue to let the homeowners have all the fun come tax time.

    Emily Landes is a writer and editor who is obsessed with all things real estate.