Wisconsin free file tax return 2016 Wisconsin Income Tax Brackets

Wisconsin's income tax brackets were last changed one year prior to 2015 for tax year 2014, and the tax rates were previously changed in 2012. Wisconsin's tax brackets are indexed for inflation, and are updated yearly to reflect changes in cost of living.

Wisconsin has four marginal tax brackets, ranging from 4% (the lowest Wisconsin tax bracket) to 7.65% (the highest Wisconsin tax bracket). Each marginal rate only applies to earnings within the applicable marginal tax bracket .

In Wisconsin, different tax brackets are applicable to different filing types. Married couples filing their Wisconsin income tax return jointly will usually have wider tax brackets than those filing separately or as an individual.

Technically, you don't have just one "tax bracket" - you pay all of the Wisconsin marginal tax rates from the lowest tax bracket to the tax bracket in which you earned your last dollar. For comparison purposes, however, your Wisconsin tax bracket is the tax bracket in which your last earned dollar in any given tax period falls.

You can think of the bracketed income tax as a flat amount for all of the money you earned up to your highest tax bracket, plus a marginal percentage of any amount you earned over that. The chart below breaks down the Wisconsin tax brackets using this model:

Wisconsin free file tax return Wisconsin Income Tax Calculator

You can use the income tax estimator to the left to calculate your approximate Wisconsin and Federal income tax based on the most recent tax brackets.

Keep in mind that this estimator assumes all income is from wages, assumes the standard deduction, and does not account for tax credits.

For a more detailed estimate that takes these factors into account, click "View Detailed Estimate" (this will will redirect to an external website).

When calculating your Wisconsin income tax, keep in mind that the Wisconsin state income tax brackets are only applied to your adjusted gross income (AGI) after you have made any qualifying deductions.

Qualifying deductions might include an itemized deduction, the Wisconsin standard deduction, exemptions for dependants, business expenses, etc.

Remember that Wisconsin may have very different deduction laws from the Federal Income Tax, so you may have to write a whole new list of deductions for your Wisconsin income tax return.

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Download or print Wisconsin income tax forms

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Wisconsin Standard Deductions & Personal Exemption Amounts

In addition to marginal tax brackets, one of the major features of the Wisconsin income tax is deductions. The three most common deductions encountered by taxpayers are the Wisconsin Standard Deduction, the Wisconsin Personal Exemption, and the Wisconsin Dependent Deduction. The current values of these deductions for tax year 2015 are as follows:

The standard deduction, which Wisconsin has, is a deduction that is available by default to all taxpayers who do not instead choose to file an itemized deduction. Essentially, it translates to $10,270.00 per year of tax-free income for single Wisconsin taxpayers, and $19,010.00 for those filing jointly.

The Personal Exemption, which is supported by the Wisconsin income tax, is an additional deduction you can take if you (and not someone else) are primarily responsible for your own living expenses. Likewise, you can take an additional dependent exemption for each qualifying dependent (like a child or family member), who you financially support.

The Federal income tax also has a standard deduction, personal exemptions, and dependant deductions, though they are different amounts than Wisconsin's and may have different rules.

Head over to the Federal income tax brackets page to learn about the Federal Income Tax, which applies in all states nationwide.

Wisconsin free file tax return Sources & Citations

Disclaimer: While we do our best to keep this list of Wisconsin income tax rates up to date and complete, we cannot be held liable for errors or omissions. Is info on this page missing or out-of-date? Please let us know so we can fix it!

Please note: Our Wisconsin tax brackets are currently from tax year 2015 (filed in April 2016). Many states adjust their tax brackets yearly, and we will update the $stateName tax brackets for 2016 / 2017 as soon as they become available.

  1. The Wisconsin tax brackets on this page were last updated from the Wisconsin Department of Revenue in 2015. Please contact us if any of our Wisconsin tax data is incorrect or out of date.
  2. Wisconsin tax return forms are available on the Wisconsin tax forms page or the Wisconsin Department of Revenue.
  3. Before the official 2017 Wisconsin income tax brackets are released, the brackets used on this page are an estimate based on the previous year's brackets. These numbers are subject to change if new Wisconsin tax tables are released.
  4. The Wisconsin income tax estimator tool is provided by Tax-Rates.org Wisconsin free file tax return.

While we take all precautions to ensure that the data on this site is correct and up-to-date, we cannot be held liable for the accuracy of the tax data we present.

This site is a free public service not affiliated with the IRS or any governmental organization.


2016-2017 Tax Season – Average IRS and State Tax Refund and Processing Times

The table below shows the average IRS federal refund payment over the last few years. For 2016 the IRS reported that 70% of taxpayers received tax refunds with an average payment of $2,860. They are expecting similar numbers for refund payment s in 2017. My prediction is that due to a stronger economy and higher employment the 2017 average refund payment will be a little lower than last year.

Generally, if you e-file and use direct deposit, the IRS estimates that you should receive your federal refund between 8 and 21 days after they accept your return, unless the IRS does not send you a notification requesting additional information or an audit notice). The IRS has stated that it issues more than 90 percent of refunds within 21 days (see estimated refund schedule).

Also note that for the 2016-17 tax season the IRS has announced that there will likely be tax refund payment delays. In particular for taxpayers claiming the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) refunds may not be processed until after February 15th in order to perform further identity verification checks.

If you did not select the electronic deposit option, getting a paper check mailed to you adds about a week. If your return was filed by mail, then your refund can take 4 to 6 weeks from the date the IRS receives a complete and accurate return. Once your return is accepted by the IRS, the IRS processes your refund based on the IRS E-file Refund Cycle Chart. Exact refund dates are based on IRS processing times and can be found in IRS Publication 2043 and IRS Topic 152 for both e-filed and mailed returns.

To find out online when the IRS currently expects to issue your refund, check the IRS “Where’s My Refund?” tool or IRS2Go mobile application which is updated every night (3am to 6am EST) You’ll need to provide the following information from your tax return : social security number, filing status and the exact whole dollar amount of your expected refund.

Should I call the IRS if I haven’t received my refund?

Unfortunately calling the IRS won’t do anything to speed your refund since their call center staff are not the ones who process the (over 140 million) tax returns. The best option is still to use check the “Where’s My Refund” page or IRS2Go application. See this article for how the IRS WMR and IRS2Go works and what each status means. If you do need to talk to a real IRS agent, this article contains some useful numbers based on what has worked for others.

When to Expect Your State Tax Refund

State refunds are processed by each individual state, so processing times will vary. As a general rule, you can expect your state tax refund within 30 days of the electronic filing date or the postmark date. To get the current status of your state tax refund, contact your state tax agency or search online for your state’s taxation website. See the table for some standard state refund processing times. Processing begins when the return is received and ends when we post the refund to your account. I will update as states release their latest processing cycle times.

Latest update : The IRS is conducting significantly more ID verification checks to deal with the increase in online tax fraud, which is also causing state tax agencies to add additional security measures resulting in delays in state tax refunds. For example, Hawaii’s taxpayers could see state refunds delayed, while a number of states are telling tax payers not to expect refund before March 1st.