I fudged the end date of my last job by six weeks. What now?

I worked at Widgets, Inc for two years. I left that job to work for Foobar, LLC. Upon starting at Foobar, LLC., I quickly learned that I had been lied to about the job description. Furthermore, my manager was verbally abusive and berated me a number of times when I had done nothing wrong. The situation was unbearable, and so I quit without giving notice. I worked there for a total of 5 weeks.

A) What's the likelihood someone will notice that I fudged my end date at Widgets, Inc. by 6 weeks?

B) If they do notice, what will happen?

C) Why in the world didn't they do the background check BEFORE they offered me the job?

D) Is there any way they can find out about my time at Foobar, LLC? None of my employment history shows up on my credit reports (I pulled all three last night).

E) And finally, what the heck do I do? Make up some excuse as to why I can't take the job? Or start work in two weeks and hope they don't uncover my lie? And what if I take the job and they do uncover the lie? What do I to then?

* I left Widgets, Inc. on good terms, and I'm pretty sure my former manager would be a positive reference If I were to ask him. However, Widgets, Inc. has a phone line for employee verification, and I believe all they tell you is start and end dates.

* I found the new job through a 3rd party recruiter, who I imagine is probably paid a hefty commission.

* I have near-perfect credit, and no criminal history.

posted by Admiral Haddock at 12:02 PM on September 30, 2011

posted by cranberrymonger at 12:04 PM on September 30, 2011

posted by Sloop John B at 12:04 PM on September 30, 2011

posted by Sloop John B at 12:07 PM on September 30, 2011

posted by Sloop John B at 12:08 PM on September 30, 2011

posted by pwnguin at 1:03 PM on September 30, 2011 [1 favorite]

Most times, the checks ask if the person was employed, and if they were terminated with cause. Sometimes they'll ask specific date. So, depends on the HR person doing the check. Either they'll assume the 6 weeks was because you left just ahead of the interview process starting, they'll flag it as unsual but not noteworthy given everything else matches up, or they'll flag it because that's the kind of detail-oriented person they are.

Depends, again. 6 weeks is not as big of a deal as say 6 months or a year or more. Again, it may just be written off as not consequential.

Because there is no reason to go through it until you accept the offer. They can still come back a few weeks to months to years in and term you for cause. My friend indicated he completed a degree when he was 3 credits short. 5 years later, someone uncovered it and he was gone that day.

Yes - everyone is doing social networking searches now. Is it relevant? Probably not, given the short term. And if it is brought up, answer above should suffice.

posted by rich at 1:08 PM on September 30, 2011 [6 favorites]

posted by justlooking at 1:54 PM on September 30, 2011

posted by justlooking at 1:56 PM on September 30, 2011

posted by Freedomboy at 1:59 PM on September 30, 2011

posted by nanojath at 7:25 PM on September 30, 2011

2. Salary (usually just ending, sometimes starting as well)

3. Reason for leaving

posted by shelleycat at 1:40 AM on October 1, 2011

posted by Sloop John B at 10:21 AM on October 3, 2011


Will background check show all my jobs

Will background check show all my jobsFrom criminal history to bad reviews from former bosses, a pre-employment background screening can cost you a job opportunity for a number of different reasons. Here are six of the most common explanations for why your background check tarnished your job chances.

The vast majority of employers these days do extensive background checks on their job applicants before making an official hiring decision. Even if you have a job offer on the table, it might be conditional on you passing a background check first. Suffice it to say that these screenings are a very important step in the job interview process, and that they can impact your chances of landing or not landing a dream job.

If you’ve never submitted to a pre-employment background check before, it can be unclear exactly what employers are looking for (or finding) in your past. You’ll find yourself asking questions like “What are they learning about me?” or “Do I have to worry about missing out on a job because of this?” Both are valid questions. To help answer them, here are six reasons that you might be rejected for a job based on a background check.

1. You have an extensive criminal history

One of the first things that employers are looking for on their applicant background checks is criminal history. The simple existence of a criminal conviction on your record doesn’t necessarily mean you will be disqualified from employment consideration. Most employers won’t look at misdemeanor offenses or older convictions as deal breakers, and people who aren’t repeat offenders are regularly given the benefit of the doubt that they are trying to rebuild their lives after a criminal offense. Violent criminals, sex offenders, notorious repeat offenders, or embezzlers are just a few of the groups that will repeatedly lose job offers due to criminal history background checks.

Ultimately, though, know that different jobs have different standards as far as acceptable criminal history is concerned. For instance, you’ll be much more likely to get hired for a warehouse job with a criminal record than you will be to win a teaching position at a public elementary school.

2. You lied on your resume

Background checks are great for uncovering an applicant’s criminal history, but they might be even better for unmasking bits of dishonesty on the resume or job application. Maybe you claimed a college degree that you don’t really have, or perhaps you lied about a previous job title or hire date. Between background checks and employment or educational verification checks, an employer has a good chance of finding out if you lied on your resume. And if you did, even if the fib was minor and seemingly inconsequential to you, it can still cost you a job opportunity. After all, what boss wants to hire a person they know is willing to lie to them?

3. Your credit history is poor

Not all employers will look into your credit history. For jobs that involve the handling of money or finances, though, you might find yourself approving a credit history check. Quite simply, your prospective employer wants to know how youhave handled your own finances in the past. And in such situations, substantial amounts of debt or evident money issues can mark you as someone who is not responsible enough for the job at hand.

4. Your driving record revealed issues

As with credit history, driving records are not something that every employer is going to look at. If you are going to be operating a vehicle as part of your job, then a driving history check should and will be a part of the applicant screening process. A speeding ticket or two shouldn’t hurt you, but if you’ve been charged with reckless driving or with operating a vehicle while intoxicated, then you’ll be out of the applicant pool as quickly as the hiring manager can shred your application.

5. A previous employer gave you a bad review

As part of a background check, hiring managers won’t just call the references you’ve listed to speak on your behalf, but they’ll also probably try to speak with your former bosses. There’s an obvious reason for this: your prospective employer wants to hear how you operate on a day-to-day basis. Are you friendly? Are you a hard worker? Is your work of a high quality? These are a few of the types of questions that a hiring manager might wish to ask your former bosses, just to get an idea of what kind of experience they would have with you as an employee.

Due to libel claims and other similar issues, some former employers won’t be willing to speak about you beyond confirming job titles, hiring dates, and salaries. However, if you left a job on bad terms or frequently had clashes with your boss, there’s a chance that information could come out during the pre-employment screening process, and it might just alter your hiring chances.

6. Your background check pulled up incorrect information

Chances are you’ve been reading this list and keeping a tally of the things you might have to worry about from background checks. You’ve never committed a crime, you were completely truthful on your resume, you have exemplary credit, your driving record is clean, and you are on great terms with all of your old bosses: you should have nothing to worry about, right?

Well, not quite. Sometimes, you can do everything right and still have your employment chances derailed by a background check. How come? Because ultimately, not every background check is going to be 100% accurate. For instance, a criminal conviction might have been filed on your record from a felon who shares your name. Or perhaps you’re a victim of identity theft, and that fact has left your credit in ruins. For these reasons, it’s a good idea to do a test background check on yourself before heading into the interview. If you find any incorrect information, you can contact the appropriate courts or departments to get everything fixed and put in proper order.

Also remember that if you do lose a job opportunity because of a background check, you have a right to know why. The employer needs to provide you with a written explanation for the decision, and you are legally permitted to request a free copy of the background check report that cost you the job. If the report was inaccurate, you can dispute the findings and get your name cleared so that you have a better shot at getting the job next time around.

Still looking for a job at an organization you’ll love? DAVIS Companies specializes in finding job seekers best fit opportunities, not just open positions. If you are looking for work, take a look at DAVIS’ job openings.


will background check show all my jobs

If somebody has been fired from one of the previous employer and the current employer comes to know

about this thing during background check ,whether the person can be laid off on this very issue that he has

been fired from one of the employer. I am talking about India.Also if somebody applies for visa whether the same thing can affect visa processing.

not allow such kind of thing and it is somewhat illegal to fire somebody on this behalf that he has been fired in past.

Still can't say about investment bank and financial institutions.

I want to make my question more clear that if somebody is fired from an organization due to misrepresentation of salary /experience whether he can be fired by any other organisation on the basis of this,once they come to know about this thing after background check though candidate might be showing everything honestly this time.

Other ranchers valuable comments are also invited.

Thanks for replies,K J Reddy your valuable comments are also invited,without which which this thread would be incomplete.

I want to make my question more clear that if somebody is fired from an organization due to misrepresentation of salary /experience whether he can be fired by any other organisation on the basis of this,once they come to know about this thing after background check though candidate might be showing everything honestly this time.

Other ranchers valuable comments are also invited.

I do not thing that reasons for leaving are investigated.IMO What is investigated is your duration and designation and nature of work at that company.

But How will those companies get salary information?

Experience enquiry is ok.

But How will those companies get salary information?

Experience enquiry is ok.

But How will those companies get salary information?

Accneture, Sap Labs, Fidelity, IBM, GE healtcare do background checks.

[ January 24, 2006: Message edited by: shalu sharma ]

can u tell me how stringent is their background checks. Do they go down to all the companes where a person has worked ? Does CSC and Hewitt also does similar checks?

I didnt understand how it makes difference. But to answer your query one of company I worked before, they went to my college, school, home town and to all my previous companies to enquire about me.

One more question do the companies cross check and verify whether you have actually worked on the projects that you have mentioned in your resume.

of experience/sal/medical ,LTA bills ,can he be fired again if company comes to know about it during

background check investigation though now he is not misrepresenting any facts.

Regarding the query from Su ,I don't think any company gives details about the kind of the project person has worked

and the skillset and all the internal thing ,at the most they can get your joining date,relieving date and last salary

drawn so one should not worried about the project details.

This thread I started to help the people and know better about the process ,this has nothing to do what should one do

or do not ,it entirely depeneds on individual conscience ,so request you to focus on thread only .

[ January 25, 2006: Message edited by: Kuldeep Dhakar ]

This thread I started to help the people and know better about the process ,this has nothing to do what should one do or do not ,it entirely depeneds on individual conscience ,so request you to focus on thread only.

1. Your last 2 jobs may be verified. So, keep these in order.

2. Smaller companies/startups - do not spend time and money in doing extensive background checks. Bigger companies especially like Fidelity/Accenture are known to do a lot of background checks.

3. Many of these background checks are bogus - as these are done by third-parties. Often these third-parties are simply unable to collect any information.

I'm sorry if I am getting too legal in this Will background check show all my jobs

but Accenture must have told these guys the reason for firing

and these guys could probably question their previous company for disclosing confidential information (though they had done mischief on their part too)

I'm sorry if I am getting too legal in this Will background check show all my jobs

but Accenture must have told these guys the reason for firing

and these guys could probably question their previous company for disclosing confidential information (though they had done mischief on their part too)

I'm sorry if I am getting too legal in this Will background check show all my jobs

but Accenture must have told these guys the reason for firing

and these guys could probably question their previous company for disclosing confidential information (though they had done mischief on their part too)

I had discussed about how companies take BGC seriously. It would be better for you to correct the same as if caught you would be in trouble

I am going to join [elided] in a couple of months. Do you guys have any idea about how [elided] conducts background verification?

Welcome to Javaranch! Will background check show all my jobs

I have been working in a company from the last 5 years. Before joining into the present company, I worked for 2 yrs in a small company which is in a small city. When I was trying for a new job, no company has called for an interview. So that I have changed my experience as 2 yrs in another city and uploaded into websites. Then I started getting calls and joined in the present company 5 yrs back by producing fake certificates showing the experience in hyd. Now I am planning to change my present company and wanted to reveal my misstatements to future company, so that there will not be any problem. Is that my approach is correct?

You got a job by faking some certificates? And you are announcing this to the world? On the internet?

I did not fake any certificate. Do not be oversmart buddy. I just want to know the process because my very first company was small which was in 2005 and does not work in the technology now i am working in. So i needed some information.

Please use proper language while posting here. I hope you realize that everyone is a volunteer here.

Are you concerned about the time taken for background verification (meaning delay in getting the appointment letter) or something? In such scenarios, it would be a good idea to talk to the HR and gain more information.

If that company was really into the technology earlier, you can tell it clearly to the HR in your interview.